The Fish

Coho Salmon

Coho, sometimes called “Silvers” in the Pacific Northwest are definitely our most commonly caught specie year in, year out. They are also our best eating fish, especially the ones caught earlier in the year such as in May and June.  Coho winter in the far Southern basin of Lake Michigan and begin migrating north, towards Kenosha, Wisconsin in great numbers as water temps begin to rise. 

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King Salmon

The King (Chinook) salmon is the fish that put Lake Michigan’s fishery on the map. People travel from all around the U.S. to enjoy charter fishing on Lake Michigan, especially out of Kenosha, Wisconsin. Here, they have an excellent chance at hooking into a large King Salmon. King’s are, arguably, the hardest fighting fish in freshwater. Good sized specimens can easily take 100 plus yards of line off of a trolling reel in mere seconds.  

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Steelhead

Steelhead(aka Rainbows) or “Steelies” are a migratory rainbow trout. In the Pacific Northwest, steelhead live in the ocean and run into a river or stream to spawn. Whereas a  true “rainbow” would live his entire life in a river or smaller lake. In the Great Lakes, steelhead live in the lake and run into rivers and streams to spawn. 

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Lake Trout

Aka “Lakers” or “LT’s” are a very common catch at just about any time of the season. They are also one of the primary native predatory fishes of the Great Lakes. Lakers thrive in cold, deep waters but we have caught them in as shallow as only 6 feet. Although they are very commonly found suspended in the water column, it is also quite common to find them actively feeding near bottom.

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Brown Trout

Browns are, by far, our least most commonly caught specie on Lake Michigan. And it isn't because they aren't there in decent numbers. It’s because their habits are considerably different from the rest of the salmon and trout species, even though they prefer the same forage (baitfish), alewives. They tolerate warmer water than the other species and tend to be very low-light feeders.                            

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